Guest Post: Re-embracing Motherhood

Guest Post: Re embracing MotherhoodWe are happy to share a guest post from one of our Faith & Family Bloggers, Cindy Dudas from Whatever Works. Cindy shares how she finds herself re-embracing motherhood. 

One of the things I’ve learned while dabbling in the social media field is that people like to read statisics.  Well, here’s one for ya: I’ve been a mom for more than 1/4 of my entire life.

For the past 10 of my 39 years here on this earth, I’ve spent a lot of time changing diapers, fixing lunches, arguing the importance of completing the before-school ritual prior to playing video games, making beds (ok, not really so much on the “making beds” part because I do hold to that theory that Hey, you’re just going to get back in it in a couple hours so why make it), BUT I digress…

Bottom line: I’m a mom.

Out of those 10 years ( minus time spent completing all the motherly tasks and sometimes sleeping), I think I have spent the majority of my time playing with my kids.  After about year 8, I got tired of it.

Yes, you read that right.  I didn’t want to play anymore.

I got tired of Candyland.  I didn’t want to make forts.  I completely stopped enjoying the swing set.

I just wanted to sit back and observe.

I started to get annoyed when my kids would ask me to join them in every single thing they did.

No, I don’t want to ride bikes.

No, I don’t want to jump in the sprinklers.

No, I don’t want to play.

Then one day I heard myself say that out loud.  And it sounded so incredibly horrible that I wanted to jump out a window.  I felt like Mommy Dearest.  What was wrong with me?  Why couldn’t I just play?

All I could think of was the catch phrase “Seven Year Itch”, but in my case it was about motherhood.  At the same time my kids craved my attention, I craved to go off to foreign lands…like any store other than Target, Justice or Five Below.  My kids wanted another teammate for a pick up game of tag, and I wanted to sit in the sun.  I wanted quiet.

Was I becoming a horrible person?  Was I really done with all the fun of motherhood?  Did I give up on my kids?

No.  To all of that self-depricating talk. . .  Just no.

When I was playing all the time and not enjoying it, I was feeling down on myself.  I wasn’t really playing; I was fake playing.  And how is that good for anyone?  The kids might have an extra body to complete their basketball team, but that’s it.  I wasn’t teaching them anything.  I wasn’t smiling.  I was actually quite childish when I forced myself into their games.  I’m not proud of it by any means.

I felt very selfish about wanting to be alone for a while.  But I realize that I must have needed it.  In some way, God was telling me to step back and reevaluate the situation.

So I said no when my kids asked me to race them in MarioKart.  I declined their invitation to a dance party.  I chose to talk with my friend on the bench instead of climbing the equipment at the playground.

I needed to show my kids that I am a person outside of being Mom.  They needed to see me doing things that I like.   And to be honest, I needed to remind myself what activities and things I actually do like!

As weird as it may sound, it made me feel strong again. Once I re-embraced my own self, I was able to re-embrace motherhood, too.  Now I feel like I can do anything.

…Even play a game of Monopoly all the way through.

 

Guest Post: Re embracing MotherhoodMeet Cindy

Cindy Dudas is a work-at-home mom who started blogging as a way to get her feelings out there.  She is a freelance writer currently writing for the Parental Guidance section of NJ.com and her own blogs Whatever Works and What the heck’s a bonbon?  

Follow Cindy on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram.

Our Development Cycle: Illustration

Our Development Cycle: Illustration

4Soils is based out of the Venture Studio at Stanford, but our illustrator, Noel, works from his home in the Philippines.  This means that most of our communication—everything from the Sphinx’s smile in Joseph, to the color of Queen Vashti’s hair in Esther— is decided through email.

Sometimes it’s difficult communicating exactly what we’re looking for in text. Sometimes, after sending emails back and forth, we have to open up an image editor and draw a mockup. It’s magical how immediately a picture can make things clear.

Our Development Cycle: Illustration

Illustrations play a similar role in our apps. They clarify the story text. They bring the Bible to life, helping children imagine how Joseph must have felt when his brothers tossed him into a cistern and sold him as a slave. So just like when writing our stories, we take great care to make sure our story illustrations really support the Bible text.

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Our Development Cycle: Story

Our Development Cycle: Story

Ever told a great joke you just heard, only to find it’s not quite as funny when it leaves your lips?

Telling Bible stories feels a lot like that. The Bible is the Greatest Story Ever Told– it’s the most influential story in Western culture– it’s the bestselling story each year, every year. And it’s the divinely inspired story that’s changed the lives of millions of people.

How do you tell a story like that?

The short answer is, with a generous dose of humility.  It’s a challenge that keeps us on our feet. But it’s a thrilling challenge, because we believe that mobile devices like the iPad and iPhone provide exciting opportunities to present the Bible to children in new and interactive ways.

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Our Development Cycle, Part 1

At 4Soils we’re often asked, “What’s it like developing Bible story apps?” If that question has ever crossed your mind, or if you’re curious about life at a mobile startup, this series of posts is for you. We’re going to explore our development cycle, from story germination all the way to product release.

In this first post, I’ll present a broad overview of our development cycle, then in the coming weeks I’ll zoom in on specific processes that we go through to bring you a new Bible Heroes apps.

Our Development Cycle, Part 1

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